UK locations where you will most likely find buried treasure exposed in stunning map

Precious metals can be found up and down the country because of Britain’s rich history, with a whopping total of 8,775 finds being made since 2012. But now you may have a chance of getting your hands on some thanks to the release of new figures from Buried Treasure Britain. Their update was made possible with the help of data from the UK Government on treasure and portable antiquities statistics. And Express.co.uk has plotted out the locations for you.

Topping the list, the Isle of Wight, which is just off the south coast of England, contains a grand total of 129.3 discoveries per 100,000 people.

This was calculation was made because there had been 184 finds on the Island since 2012.

The Isle of Wight is known for having a spectacular history that dates back to before the Bronze Age, and it is expected that there is plenty more old treasure to be found if you look hard enough.

But now you may have a chance of getting your hands on some thanks to the release of new figures from Buried Treasure Britain.

Their update was made possible with the help of data from the UK Government on treasure and portable antiquities statistics.

And Express.co.uk has plotted out the locations for you.

Topping the list, the Isle of Wight, which is just off the south coast of England, contains a grand total of 129.3 discoveries per 100,000 people.

This was calculation was made because there had been 184 finds on the Island since 2012.

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Topping the list, the Isle of Wight, which is just off the south coast of England, contains a grand total of 129.3 discoveries per 100,000 people.

This was calculation was made because there had been 184 finds on the Island since 2012.

The Isle of Wight is known for having a spectacular history that dates back to before the Bronze Age, and it is expected that there is plenty more old treasure to be found if you look hard enough.

Coming in at second place, Norfolk had 100.3 finds per 100,000 people since 2012.

Some notable finds here include a Medieval chandelier and a Bronze Age sword.

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Norfolk also has a rich history, and it is known for having been a rich Anglo county that was populated by a variety of different groups throughout its history.

In third place, Dorset had 82.7 discoveries per 100,000 people.

The first known settlement in Dorset dates all the way back to 12,500BC so there is likely to be plenty of old treasure to be found here too.

Although it came second on the map list, Norfolk was actually the place with the most treasure finds in the last decade.

Following behind it in that department are Suffolk, and after that, Essex.

In Suffolk, there were 581 treasure finds since 2012, and in Essex, 570 bits of treasure were found.

Suffolk was originally settled by the Angles in the latter half of the fifth century, which explains why such a large amount of treasure has been found there.

As for Essex, it was traditionally founded in 527 AD, and its name originates from the Early Middle Ages, when the Eastern kingdom of Saxon came from the continent to settle in Britain.

Data for the number of treasures and portable antiquities found in the UK between 2012 and 2019 was taken from the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport ‘Treasure and portable antiquities statistics’ collection.

They were matched with ‘Estimates of the population for the UK, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland’ data from ONS to calculate likely it is that an individual would have a chance at finding treasure in each location per 100,000 people in the population of that region.

Harry Byrne

Harry Byrne

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